How To Make Turkish Coffee

Turkish coffee has been around since the 16th century. It's one of the first brewing methods with a deep history and rich culture. Turkish coffee is popular all over the world, but it is most widespread in the Middle East, North Africa, the Caucasus, the Balkans, and other territories that were once part of the Ottoman Empire. Turkish coffee was the main brewing method used by the Ottomans.

"Turkish" coffee is a European and American name. In the Middle East, a drink prepared this way is simply called "coffee."

Turkish coffee is made in a small, long-handled pot called a cezve or ibrik. The coffee is very dense and strong because no filter is used, because small coffee particles remain in the finished drink, and because it is brewed for a long time at a high temperature.

How to Make Turkish Coffee In a Cezve

You will need:

  • Pure drinking water (total mineralization 50-150 ppm, room temperature)
  • Coffee grinder with the ability to do a fine grind. Visually, it should look like extra-fine salt. For dark roasts, you can use a slightly larger grind.
  • Scale
  • Cezve
  • Freshly roasted coffee

Step-by-step instructions are described in the table below.

Turkish Coffee

Brew Time: 5 Min

Yield: 2 Cups

Instructions

What You Need

  • Cezve
  • Scale (optional)
  • Blade or Burr Grinder
  • Freshly Roasted Coffee
  • Water
  • Spoon
  • Sugar or spices - as requested


1. Grind your coffee finely.


2. Add sugar (if desired), water, and ground coffee to the cezve.


3. Using a cezve spoon, stir the coffee and place the cezve on the stove.


4. Slowly bring the coffee mixture to a simmer over medium heat. This will take 3-4 minutes.


5. When the coffee is hot, you will see dark foam. Pour this foam into the cups and place the cezve back on the stove.


6. Once the coffee boils, pour half of the coffee into the cups, on top the foam.


7. Put the cezve back on the stove again, boil the remaining coffee for another 15-2- seconds, and pour the rest into the coffee cups.


8. Serve with water and Turkish delight.

Tips for Making Turkish Coffee

Grinding and Dosage

For Turkish coffee, use a fine grind. It should feel like dust or powder. It is because of this that the cezve is the only brewing method for which you can use a blade grinder.

The dosage of coffee depends on the size of the cezve. To determine the dosage, you need to measure how much water can be placed in the cezve under the place where the neck begins to narrow.

For example, if your cezve claims its volume is 7 fl oz (210 ml), then 5 fl oz (150 ml) of water is recommended.

Coffee-to-Water Ratio

The normal ratio of coffee to water for Turkish coffee is 1:10. That is, for 5 fl oz (150 ml) of water, you need 0.52 oz (15 g) of coffee.

Turkish Coffee

Serving (brewed coffee)

Regular Coffee 1:10

Water 1:10

Cups

fl oz

ml

grams

oz

ml

fl oz

1

2.5

74

7.5

0.26

2.5

74

2

5

148

15

0.53

5

148

3

7.5

222

22

0.78

7.5

222

4

10

296

30

1

10

296

5

12.5

370

37

1.3

12.5

370

Equipment

To make coffee in a cezve, you need a good burr grinder that is capable of fine grinding. But you can also use a blade grinder.

In addition to a coffee grinder, you need room-temperature water with low mineralization (50–150 mg/L), freshly roasted coffee, a stirring spoon, and the cezve itself. We recommend a copper or ceramic cezve.

Copper cezve are used in Turkey. It is important that the copper cezve has an inner lining of silver or food-grade tin. The vessel has a wide base, tapers towards the top, and has a spout.

The diameter of the neck should be 15-20% less than the diameter of the base if the cezve is of standard geometry (the taper is closer to the top). This is important for the coffee foam to form.

Cezves come in a variety of sizes, from small (1 cup) to large (6 or even 8 cups), but it is best not to use a cezve over 10 fl oz (300 ml). In a big cezve, the coffee will be under-extracted.

In addition, it's important to choose a cezve that has enough free space (but not too much) after you add water. When brewing, the coffee will rise in the cezve and form a foam. If there is too much space in the cezve, the foam can burn to the edges and impart unwanted bitterness.

When brewed correctly in a cezve, Turkish coffee is very rich and thick. Here's a very important tip: never take your eyes off the coffee when brewing it in cezve. It can boil over in a matter of seconds.

If you want to add flavor to your drink, you can add sugar and spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, or anise to the cezve. In any case, follow this rule: add loose ingredients (spices or sugar) to ground coffee and liquid ingredients (syrup) to already-brewed coffee.

What Is the Best Type of Coffee to Use In a Cezve?

Any type. The choice of coffee is a matter of taste. Don't be afraid to try a robusta blend—these work well in a cezve. You can use any roast you like—light, medium, or dark.

There is some debate over whether or not to stir the coffee while brewing in a cezve. Stirring coffee after it's removed from the heat will result in a much cleaner cup as the grounds present in the foam will settle to the bottom.

However, advocates of not stirring the coffee while brewing argue that an equal amount of foam should go into each cup. To stir or not is a matter of preference, but in any case, stirring should only be done once the coffee has been removed from the heat.